Cori_Daines

Cori Daines M.D.

Professor and Division Chief, University of Arizona--Banner University Med Cent

Cori Daines, MD Cori Daines is a Professor of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine at the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona and division chief of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine. Dr. Daines received her undergraduate degree from Texas A&M University and her medical degree from St. Louis University. She completed her residency in Pediatrics at St. Louis University/Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital and her fellowship in Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine at the University of North Carolina. She was faculty at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital prior to coming to Tucson in 2007. She serves on several national committees for the American Thoracic Society and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Dr. Daines has broad-ranging interests in Pediatric Pulmonology, serving in Tucson as the CF Center Director, Director of the Pediatric Flexible Bronchoscopy Program, Director of the Home Tracheostomy and Ventilator Program, Director of the Pulmonary Neuromuscular Program, Director of our Children with Special Needs Program, Director of Pediatric Respiratory Care for Banner University Medical Center, and the pulmonary member of the Pediatric Aerodigestive Program. She also has been involved in Banner’s Advanced Leadership for Physician’s Program and serves on the Operations Committee for Banner University Medical Group. Dr. Daines’ research interests have focused on clinical and translational research in cystic fibrosis as well as quality improvement research with cystic fibrosis. She currently directs the Tucson Therapeutics Development Center of the CFF to lead clinical research, directs Tucson’s participation in the CFF Success with Therapies Research Consortium, sits on the CFF North American Conference Planning Committee and serves as a Coach for the CFF TDN’s eQUIP-CR quality improvement in CF clinical research program. She also serves on the board of the Southern Arizona’s Chapter for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

Appearances